Lost Worlds – Aboriginal Australia

One of the greatest farces of Australian History is that commonly the history taught to our children only takes into account the last 200 years or so of cultural development. It is almost as though our centres of Education, chose not to acknowledge that our history is over 50,000 years and more of continual cultural development. Culture is about us all… and the many facets of a land, facets which make the gem, that is Aus’, dance in the light. Our culture, in all its facets, is the longest continuing culture in the world. It is that which is still within our reach to preserve, given the tools available to us… writing and the building of record, this to share down through the ages. It is not only a farce that we ignore what is a real treasure in our own time, but a tragedy that we should be so ignorant.

Research is a large part of my writing, the stories I scribe and the tales I tell. Recently I came across a remarkable Doco’ … Did I mention that I love YouTube as a resource amongst other assets of the Internet… Well I came across a wonderful piece of work and I wanted to share it with you. Its a Doco… largely presenting the culture of Arnhem Land and its a treasure, well worth the hour to watch.

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Penguin Island and the Swan Plain Karst, WA

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Back in the Jurassic, in the time when the dinosaurs of Gondwana roamed along the Western Australian shores, the foundation was laid down on the floor of the ocean for the subterranean caves that dive deep into the limestone beds found around Perth. This in part is the Swan Plain Karst, a broad shore of Limestone that has been carved and fashioned by the subterranean rivers that flow beneath our feet, and in land movement over the ages. Continue reading

Crystal Cave – Yanchep National Park WA

caving yanchepFresh from our journey through the Oondiri Caves and not far from our discovery of the Mole Creek Caves (upcoming in the free on-line mag’ RV Daily), our mind is still focused and fascinated with the Limestone Karsts of Aus’. As such, knowing that Western Australia’s SW region has large Limestone Karsts in their own right, the Leeuwin-Naturaliste Karst and the Swan Coastal Plain in particular, we started to take a good look around Perth where we are now stationed for a month or two. Continue reading

Tasmania and Travellers Rest Area’s

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Having just returned from our adventures in Tasmania we are growing once more accustomed to the life of the traveller as we move up through the eastern seaboard. We are at the present preparing to cross the Oondiri Plain once more and spend the winter months in WA but more about that later. Continue reading

Maria Island – Tasmania

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We had promised ourselves a cruise while we travelled the east coastline of Tas’ and it was a hard choice. However I couldn’t have been more pleased than with our choice of a cruise on the Spirit of Maria out from the little fishing port town of Triabunna barely 1 ½ – 2 hrs from Hobart and Launceston. Continue reading

A Peek into Australia’s Past – The Palawa & Us All

ben-lomond-viewThe Palawa, is the name by which the Tasmanian Aboriginal tribes were in general known. There were several tribal groups that identified with different area’s of Tas’, such as the Big River tribe, a central tribe associated with the central rivers and lakes or the North Eastern tribe whose lands were those around The Bay of Fires and so on. These tribal people ranged across all of Tasmania in migrations, according to the different season. But they knew their country and their homelands and identified themselves with that region and no body argued about it much. Continue reading

Up There, Our Heads in the Clouds – Ben Lomond, Tas

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One of the things that we didn’t expect to find in our travels around Tas’ was the beauty of Ben Lomond and its tabletop plateau, which is Tasmania’s primary Ski Resort and a spectacular alpine region of the Apple Isle. We never actually gave it a thought… we knew about Cradle Mountain and its glorious landscape, often shrouded in clouds. Continue reading