Freecamping is Really About Community

Coopernook

Freecamping is really about Community and I have long held the opinion that any and all towns worthy of their name should have a rest area, or freecamp, freely available to travellers, as they once historically did in Australia. The history of the evolution of the provision of camps for the traveller goes right back to the very first days of the colony when Governor Phillip set up camp on the shores of Botany Bay… then found a better spot and moved to Sydney Cove. Free camping is not only about the travelling community, but also about the communities the travellers move into. Even Governor Phillip recognised this in his endeavour to build a relationship with the locals. But it is something that today has been lost to the demons of commerce.

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Becoming Part of the Wildlife

Lake Hume

One of the best things about living in a caravan and freecamping, particularly in wilderness and remote regions, is that if you wait around long enough you truly abandon society and become part of the wildlife. We recently were very surprised to realize that this too can occur in a caravan park, albeit that the wildlife is a tad tamer than usual.

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Freecamping Around “Country” and What It Means

Screen Shot 2013-12-07 at 7.04.36 amWe are currently back where we began many years ago.. in fact we are fluffing around what could be considered “Country”.  The meaning of the term, in the Aussie modern vernacular, means a great deal. It is where you find your world, where you are at home even though it may not be your home anymore. It is often the place of your birth and passage to adulthood as within the Aboriginal meaning.

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Camping Amongst the Giants – Victoria’s Forests

forest campbarkThere is nothing quite like the dawn as it sweeps through the forest in the early break of day. These are the things that I love about camping in the forestry. The forests are a place of mystery for me, a place of quite contemplation where you can sit with the giants of the land. Here in Victoria it is a wonderful place to enjoy the forests. Having recently been in the west coast forests of the US where the trees are mostly pine, I can truly appreciate the diversity of Aussie forests. It is coming on winter here… autumn has settled and the beautiful gums are shedding their coats of bark, littering the forest floor. The colours are breathtaking.  Continue reading

So You Plan to do The Lap? – Grey Nomads of Aus’

Washing Day

I’m parked up in another of the many bush camp today, and I do love the bush camp I have discovered. Previously I have written about the delights of a camp out amongst the gum trees, but in our time travelling full time around Aus’ … and for a long time on and off, we have heard so many of our friends and mates comment on how we are living the life. We are dawdling our way around the country on “The Lap” and already we are planning lap No.2 … there is just so much to see and so many adventures to be had. So I thought it was perhaps time to look at just what that means as a lifestyle.

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The Nullabor Links – Golfing the Longest Course in the World

golfThe game has begun, actually it begun the day when The Man hit off at Kalgoorlie on the Nullarbor Links Golf course. He is playing the longest golf course in the world… some 1,365klm long, running as it does alongside the path of the Eyre Highway. It is going to take anything from a few weeks to a few days to complete the course. For us it will be more weeks… than days.

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Seafood Heaven – Eyre Peninsula SA

Streaky BayThe best thing about emerging from the Oondiri Plain (Nullabor), headed east is that you inevitably arrive into the Eyre Peninsula. It is a seafood heaven, a place where the cold waters of the Great Southern Ocean deliver a bounty of seafood. We are camped up in Streaky Bay on the western coast of the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia. Continue reading

Nullabor Plains – Caverns of the Dreamtime

Madura caveVisiting the Nullabor Caves has been something we have wanted to do for some time. It is commonly believed that there are only a few caves along the Eyre Highway and while most caves are within reach of the highway there are many more than you can count. Continue reading

People of the Nullabor – Mundrabilla

Dawn over NullaborMost Australians believe the Nullabor, known historically as the Oondiri, is a desert wasteland. In general one sparsely populated with people who would choose to live elsewhere, and they couldn’t be more wrong. The Oondiri is a fascinating place, with a human history that stretches back 18,000 years at the very least. Descendant’s of the ancient tribes who once sparcely populated the waterless plain are now mostly settled in desert towns such as Norseman and Kalgoorlie. They wander the plains no more and this is a choice they make, as do we the vast majority of us. Continue reading

The Oondiri – Travelling the Nullabor

Nullabor crossing mapThe Nullabor, the name has always irritated me because it is such an enigma to what you actually find. The vast ancient region was named in August 1865, while an explorer was travelling from the east across the Hampton Tablelands, along the most arid of sections. E. A. Delisser in his journal named both the Nullabor and Eucla. This was how the largest limestone karst in the world received its European name. Its meaning is found in the Latin Nullus Arbor (It seems Delisser spelt it Aus’ style) the meaning is however ‘No trees/plants’. This is simple a misconception as the vast region is most certainly not treeless.

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