The Wet Season in Far North Queensland

Barron Falls

It’s approaching time to head south, its time to leave the rainforest and our safe little camp nestled into the ridge. The monsoons have arrived and the Wet season is promising to settle in. All across the inland the water is at last beginning to flow after a long drought and it is gunna get damp in FNQ. I know this because the ants are on the move and small spots of mould are starting to appear into the crevices in the van. I spend a few minutes each day spraying and cleaning these pesky reminders of living in the Wet Season in the Far North Queensland Tropics.

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15 Things I’ve learnt as a Grey Nomad

Corella Dam Cloncurry

1. Blessed are the Chiller Bags

These handy zippered bags are the best thing since sliced bread. They are cheap as chips, readily available and great for storage and all manner of things. We store our seasonal clothes (out of season) in these and use them for dirty clothes. We prefer them to plastic when shopping or picnicking and they are great for holding ropes, cables and the like.

2. Companionship is Precious

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Lapping Aus’ – What Next?

Salt lake campWe’ve completed The Lap, an Aussie dream and yes… we adored our time travelling. It was all part of our retirement plan and given 18 months we feel that we took way too little time to appreciate all our country has to show us. We planned diligently and as happens, found we had commitments to meet with family and friends all along the way as well as our many adventures. These we all very much enjoyed but there was so much to see that we had to set aside for another visit a great deal and already we have made plans to return to many of these places. We also made lots of new and great friends who we continue to run into, who we follow on Facebook and with whom we will catch up with again for sure. Plans are already afoot.

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Freecamping Around “Country” and What It Means

Screen Shot 2013-12-07 at 7.04.36 amWe are currently back where we began many years ago.. in fact we are fluffing around what could be considered “Country”.  The meaning of the term, in the Aussie modern vernacular, means a great deal. It is where you find your world, where you are at home even though it may not be your home anymore. It is often the place of your birth and passage to adulthood as within the Aboriginal meaning.

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Seafood Heaven – Eyre Peninsula SA

Streaky BayThe best thing about emerging from the Oondiri Plain (Nullabor), headed east is that you inevitably arrive into the Eyre Peninsula. It is a seafood heaven, a place where the cold waters of the Great Southern Ocean deliver a bounty of seafood. We are camped up in Streaky Bay on the western coast of the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia. Continue reading

Nullabor Plains – Caverns of the Dreamtime

Madura caveVisiting the Nullabor Caves has been something we have wanted to do for some time. It is commonly believed that there are only a few caves along the Eyre Highway and while most caves are within reach of the highway there are many more than you can count. Continue reading

Revised and Revisited – An Authors Journey

Corella Dam CloncurryWe all have a story to be told, a book lurking within our mind and many of us promise ourselves one day that we will write that story. Few of us do, even fewer of us publish the tale and many of us give up on the dream when faced with the inherent effort and problems and for a myriad of other reasons.

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The Bush Camp – Oldies at Large

Salt lake campI was born a city girl, one who grew up in the bush on the edge of the city, on the wrong side of the river my Great Grandparents would say. My Grandfather crossed the Georges River to the wilder south side of Sydney near a century ago, despite the advice of his parents. He built a home for his family amongst oyster leases, fishing huts, native camps and Chinamen who worked in those wonderful Chinese gardens in the cities of yesteryear. It was on the southern edge of Sydney in the 1920’s at Oyster Bay. Things have changed a lot since then … it is now considered millionaires row and the beautiful isolated peninsula is a much sort after suburb.

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WA’s Recreational Camps – A History

Sunrise WAWhile we are preparing to point our noses east across the ‘Nullabor’ once more, (colonial spelling here), having dawdled around the shores of the SW corner of Western Australia, there is a history here that has become more evident. It is an unexpected tale perhaps. We have all heard of Australia’s whaling history, where the giants of the sea were once harvested indiscriminately along our shores and particularly along the shores of the SW WA, while settlement and colonization crept across the land. The harvest that is believed to have begun around 1837 was huge and bountiful and it decimated the whale population leaving a lasting impression on places like Albany, Esperance and much of the south west coast in a vivid history. The industry lured the French and Yanks to our shores as their ships cargoed the convicts and then turned their interests to whales in season. On the return run back to their home port they took the bounty of our seas with them. This oceanic massacre however eventually led to the industries own demise as whale numbers declined steadily over the decades of indiscriminate hunting and killing.   Continue reading

Sea, Sand and Sun WA – Albany

SW WAAlbany Shire has long held a reputation for welcoming the traveller. She sits on the middle shores of the Great Southern Ocean in Western Australia. Her beaches stretching into inlets and bays are now the precinct of the fisherman and boaties alike. It was once where whalers and sealers hunted, where emigrants passed by following the coast seeking the path to inland gold, the often sad tears of the sun and where traditional natives feasted and followed their Songlines and sandy trails in an endless cycle of surviving the seasons of the sun and wind. It is a region of immense beauty with tall giants settled into her forests and winding tracks of soft and solid sands offering recreational entertainment for the 4×4 enthusiast. The shire is RV friendly with a number of rest area’s, many that could do with a loo or two, yet she sits proud amongst those coastal towns of WA offering welcome within her region and a myriad of activities and entertainments. Continue reading